2018: Facing the TBR

At the end of 2017, I realized that I have a serious problem: I own a lot of unread books. Usually I kick off January with some sort of TBR challenge, and 2018 is no different. This year, I am joining Roof Beam Reader’s Official 2018 TBR Pile Challenge. The rules are simple enough: in 2018, I have to read and review 12 books on my TBR that were published before 2017. I can also list two alternate titles in case a couple of my original choices don’t pan out. I can read the books in any order at any time before January 2019. Sounds simple enough, but truth be told I am not the best at challenges. I have great hope for this year, though. Here’s my list:

Homegoing, Yaa Gyasi
The Sympathizer, Viet Thanh Nguyen
Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, Sunil Yapa
News of the World, Paulette Giles
The Good Lord Bird, James McBride
IQ, Joe Ide
Pleasantville, Attica Locke
Family Matters, Rohinton Mistry
Indian Killer, Sherman Alexie
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, Yuval Noah Harari
LaRose, Louise Erdrich
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea, Barbara Demick
Notes from a Small Island, Bill Bryson (alternate)
Wolf in White Van, John Darnelle (alternate)

But my problem goes way beyond 14 books. Way. Beyond. So, I’m setting up some rules for 2018, the first one being that I cannot purchase any new books until my birthday at the end of July, and then again at the holidays. If I want to read something that’s not on my shelves, I have to go to the library. I have only one exception, which is a book I pre-ordered in 2017, Michelle McNamara’s I’ll Be Gone in the Dark. I was a fan of her blog, True Crime Diary, and her work on the Golden State Killer case (so chilling) and was happy to hear that her husband, the actor and comedian Patton Oswalt, was seeing to it that her book would still be published after her untimely death in 2016. That’s coming in February, so until July, that’s it for me. I also plan to limit myself to buying three books, which will be a total of seven for the year. To be honest, I’m actually hoping that I get to my birthday and decide I don’t want to buy anything at all.

I used to do the TBR Dare, committing to reading only books from the TBR every January through April, a tradition I plan to continue on my own since it doesn’t seem anyone is hosting it this year. I’ll use this post to track how many of these other unread books on my TBR I can get through in 2018. Mind you, these books have been purchased (most of them on Kindle sale, my weakness) over a period of more than five years, so no judging! (Or at least, not too much judging.) Most of these are also marked as “Shelved to read” on my Goodreads page, but I’m listing as many as possible here for double accountability. Here we go:

Elmet, Fiona Mozley
Marlena, Julie Buntin
Borne, Jeff VanderMeer
The Dark Dark, Samantha Hunt
The Fire This Time, Jesmyn Ward
Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado
Tomb Song, Julian Herbert
Gutshot, Amelia Gray
The Blue Fox, Sjón
Fierce Kingdom, Gin Phillips
The Heart’s Invisible Furies, John Boyne
Pachinko, Min Jin Lee
The Child Finder, Rene Denfeld
The Dry, Jane Harper
The Queen of the Night, Alexander Chee
Behind Her Eyes, Sarah Pinborough
Since We Fell, Dennis Lehane
The Late Show, Michael Connelly
Bluebird, Bluebird, Attica Locke
Sunshine State, Sarah Gerard
My Family and Other Animals, Gerald Durrell
You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, Sherman Alexie
Mongrels, Stephen Graham Jones
The Dollhouse, Fiona Davis
The Wangs vs. the World, Jade Chang
Girl Through Glass, Sari Wilson
This Is Your Life Harriet Chance, Jonathan Evison
A Gentleman in Moscow, Amor Towles
The Tsar of Love and Techno, Anthony Marra
The Blazing World, Siri Hustvedt
The Golem and the Jinni, Helene Wecker
Mrs. Bridge, Evan S. Connell
All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, Bryn Greenwood
The Essex Serpent, Sarah Perry
Slade House, David Mitchell
The Miniaturist, Jessie Burton
Love and Other Ways of Dying, Michael Paterniti
Dodgers, Bill Beverly
Remember Me Like This, Bret Anthony Johnston
Ragtime, E.L. Doctorow
Western Stories, Elmore Leonard
Made for Love, Alissa Nutting
Lady Cop Makes Trouble, Amy Stewart
Disclaimer, Renee Knight
Born Standing Up, Steve Martin
The Master, Colm Toibin
During the Reign of the Queen of Persia, Joan Chase
The Transit of Venus, Shirley Hazzard
The Observations, Jane Harris
The Report, Francis Kane
Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand, Helen Simonson
The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood
The Invention of Everything Else, Samantha Hunt
Doc, Maria Doria Russell
The Age of Wonder, Richard Holmes
The North Water, Ian McGuire
Eileen, Ottessa Moshfegh
Regeneration, Pat Barker
The Illusionist, Colson Whitehead
Life Drawing, Robin Black
The Year of Silence, Madison Smartt Bell
Alias Grace, Margaret Atwood
Christodora, Tim Murphy
The Last Days of California, Mary Miller
Loner, Teddy Wayne
The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife, and the Missing Corpse, Piu Marie Eatwell
Master and Commander, Patrick O’Brian
An Unnecessary Woman, Rabih Alameddine
White Is for Witching, Helen Oyeyemi
Only Love Can Break Your Heart, Ed Tarkington
The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards, Kristopher Jansma
A Little Life, Hanya Yanagihara
Hillbilly Elegy, J.D. Vance
The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, Katherine Howe
White Oleander, Janet Fitch
Dissolution, C.J. Sansom
Black Swan Green, David Mitchell
American Rust, Philipp Meyer
Q Road, Bonnie Jo Campbell
Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Katherine Boo
The Shore, Sara Taylor
The Infatuations, Javier Marias
The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, Anton Disclafani
The Map of Lost Memories, Kim Fay
Private Citizens, Tony Tulathimutte
Stone Arabia, Dana Spiotta
The Last Summer of the Camperdowns, Elizabeth Kelly
Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates
Code Name Verity, Elizabeth Wein
A Home at the End of the World, Michael Cunningham
The Leftovers, Tom Perrotta
Black River, S.M. Hulse
Is This Tomorrow, Caroline Leavitt
The Informationist, Taylor Stevens
The Irresistible Henry House, Lisa Grunwald
Eva’s Eye, Karin Fossum
A Better World, Marcus Sakey
Save Yourself, Kelly Braffet
Welcome to Braggsville, T. Geronimo Johnson
Lost Girls, Robert Kolker
The Patrick Melrose Novels, Edward St. Aubyn
Sick in the Head, Judd Apatow
Lost Memory of Skin, Russell Banks
The Cowboy and the Cossack, Clair Huffaker
Funny Girl, Nick Hornby
Thrown, Kerry Howley
A Partial History of Lost Causes, Jennifer Dubois
The Might Have Been, Joseph M. Schuster
Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel
Cry Father, Benjamin Whitmer
Nothing Gold Can Stay, Ron Rash
Die a Little, Megan Abbott
The Shining Girls, Lauren Beukes
Visitation Street, Ivy Pochoda
King Leopold’s Ghost, Adam Hochschild
Nora Webster, Colm Toibin
Child 44, Tom Rob Smith
New York Trilogy, Paul Auster
The Crimson Petal and the White, Michel Faber
Blackbirds, Chuck Wendig
Long Division, Kiese Laymon
The Maid’s Version, Daniel Woodrell
The Devil All the Time, Donald Ray Pollock
Double Feature, Owen King
Battleborn, Claire Vaye Watkins
Birds of a Lesser Paradise, Megan Mayhew Bergman
The Thief, Fuminori Nakamura
Gun, with Occasional Music, Jonathan Lethem
Troubles, J.G. Ferrell
All Things, All at Once, Lee K. Abbott
Civilwarland in Bad Decline, George Saunders
The Street Sweeper, Elliot Perlman
The Girl Who Fell from the Sky, Heidi W. Durrow
HHhH, Laurent Binet
When It Happens to You, Molly Ringwald
The Nix, Nathan Hill
Ways to Disappear, Ivy Pochoda
Ready Player One, Ernest Cline
Fobbit, David Abrams
Elizabeth is Missing, Emma Healey

2018 should be an interesting year!


2017: Looking Forward

Happy New Year! It’s hard to believe the holidays are already over, but I don’t think many of us are sad to say goodbye to 2016. While 2016 may have not been the best year in more ways than I care to list, as I mentioned in my year-end review post, I had an unusually strong reading year. With my first pick of 2017, Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl, that trend seems to be continuing. I’m not even a third of the way through that one and I’m already in love with it. Something about Jahren’s writing and worldview remind me of my beloved M Train, so I can see it easily taking a place on my year-end favorites list. Crazy, right?

My reading goals for this year are very loosey-goosey, but I am joining a couple of challenges. For the fifth year in a row, I’ll be joining the TBR Dare (formerly known as The TBR Double Dog Dare and created and previously hosted by James), which has been taken over by Lizzy and Annabel. The general idea is to tackle your TBR by reading books exclusively from your shelves from January through March (or longer if you dare). I have about five books that I placed on hold at the library well before the new year, but aside from those I’ll be reading books I already own well through April.

This year I also decided to join Book Riot’s Retro Rereads group. I am hoping to reread at least 12 books (one per month). While I’m not going to pick them all out ahead of time, I have a few in mind: Just Kids by Patti Smith, In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O’Brien, Straight Man by Richard Russo, Crooked Hearts by Robert Boswell, Bel Canto by Ann Patchett, and Paris Stories by Mavis Gallant.

I’d also like to read more non-fiction this year (I only read three works of non-fiction last year, and two of those I didn’t even finish). And as someone who used to read short story collections almost exclusively, last year I didn’t read a single collection, so that needs to remedied as well.

As for blogging, my main goal is simply to blog more. I’m not sure what that will look like, but when I was doing my year-end post I realized how little I shared of this terrific reading year. I’m not going to commit to writing formal reviews of everything I read, but I definitely would like to share more, even if I’m just posting some favorite passages from what I’m reading. If you’re generally interested in keeping up with what I read outside the blog, you can also follow me on Goodreads.

So that’s it for me in a nutshell. What are your reading plans for 2017?

2016: Looking Back

As I mentioned in my Favorite Books of 2016 post, 2016 was a fantastic year in reading for me. Honestly, I can’t remember a better year since maybe 2012. The better part of my reading year was filled with four- and five-star books, and not simply because I was being generous. At the same time, several books I expected to love didn’t make the cut. You can see everything I read this year here, but I wanted to cover a few highlights of my reading year that aren’t just about favorites:

My very favorite books of the year were Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner and Commonwealth by Ann Patchett.

The book I finished too late to consider for year-end favorites was The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin. This fictional account of Truman Capote and his New York society “swans” was a delightful surprise. If you enjoyed this one, I highly recommend The Two Mrs. Grenvilles by Dominick Dunne, a fictionalized account of the story of Ann Woodward, the socialite accused of murdering her husband.

The best debut author I read was hands-down Imbolo Mbue. Behold the Dreamers, a novel about a Cameroonian family employed by a Titan of Wall Street just before the 2008 crash, is so powerful that feels like it was written by someone who has already churned out award-winning work. Unlike a lot of novels that deal with contemporary events, I can see this one becoming a book that remains relevant because Mbue seamlessly manages to integrate a timeless story about wanting a better life with current events, events that never overshadow the more intimate drama of a husband and wife’s struggles to get ahead. It got some good attention, but I don’t think it got nearly enough. I look forward to reading her next book. She will most definitely be a writer to watch.

Another book I thought deserved more attention was The Unseen World by Liz Moore. Ada Sibelius’s father, the only parent she has ever known, is beginning to lose his mind. In the midst of this crisis, she learns a family secret that sends her on a mission to learn the truth about her father. Moore never lets Ada’s story veer into melodrama, nor does she turn the eccentric Ada into a silly caricature of quirkiness. Moore is a quiet writer, developing deep, original characters without sacrificing plot. I also recommend her novel Heft.

A book from my TBR pile that made quite an impression on me was Crow Lake by Mary Lawson. I bought it used five or six years ago after browsing through the (virtual) bargain bins on Better World Books, and then I promptly  stuck it on the shelf and forgot about it, probably in favor of something new and shiny everyone was discussing. This is another debut novel, although Lawson, a Canadian, was 56 when it was published (hope for us all). It tells the story of the four Morrison children, whose parents are tragically killed in a car accident at the beginning of the book. The novel has an unreliable narrator in Kate Morrison, who has very definite ideas about how the family tragedy has shaped everything in their lives. This novel is an interesting and often quietly humorous look at how family roles and myths can lock us into patterns that may actually have nothing at all to do with what really happened.

I re-read three books this year, M Train by Patti Smith, You Remind Me of Me by Dan Chaon, and Machine Dreams by Jayne Anne Phillips. I loved every single one of these books the first time around, and I’m happy to say they remained five-star reads. Re-reading M Train was like visiting a favorite friend, and I suspect it’s a book I could re-read every year without tiring of it. In 2017 I am planning to re-read Just Kids (more on that in a forthcoming “Looking Forward” post), but I may make room for both. I originally read You Remind Me of Me in 2005, on two long plane trips to and from Las Vegas. Like Kent Haruf or Bonnie Nadzam, Chaon is one of those writers who beautifully crafts the small stories of people in the so-called flyover states. Machine Dreams was Phillips’s (probably best known for her novel Lark & Termite) debut novel, and it covers the years from WWII through Vietnam, giving us the changing face of a nation and times through the stories of family of four in small-town West Virginia.

Thirty-six of the fifty-five books I’ve read this year were by new-to-me authors. Of those books, the best surprises were All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews, Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt, and A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay. All My Puny Sorrows sounded like a book I would love from the get-go (because who doesn’t love books about suicide, really?), but the humor was completely unexpected. The latter two were both definitely outside my wheelhouse and were books I picked up because they were generating so much buzz with readers I trust. Mr. Splitfoot is absolutely grounded and magical at the same time, and Hunt never gives over to too much weirdness or too much explanation. A Head Full of Ghosts is supremely clever, even for those of us who aren’t horror fans, with fully realized characters and an overall interesting take on family narratives. Oh, and also an honorable mention for Rules of Civility by Amor Towles, which didn’t surprise me so much but did delight me to no end.

Thirty-one of the fifty-five books I read were by women, but only a lousy seven were by non-white authors, which is an issue I realized late in the year. To tell the truth, it makes me squeamish to count such things, though, because it makes me feel like I am patting myself on the back and congratulating myself on what a good little white person I am. That said, I realize I need to be more aware. The main thing I plan to do in 2017 is purchase books by non-white authors, so I can vote with my dollar and tell publishers what kind of books I want to see them publish. Except for books by favorite authors, when it comes to white authors I’ll probably start using the library more frequently. As much as I’d love to BUY ALL THE BOOKS, I have too many unread books right now to justify buying more unless the purchase makes a meaningful statement in some way. Given the recently announced Simon & Schuster decision to give a book contract to a white supremacist, I think voting with our wallets is more important than ever.

Only four of the books I read got two-star ratings: Siracusa by Delia Ephron, The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson, We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas, and Empire of the Summer Moon by S.C. Gwynne. Siracusa and The Kind Worth Killing were on a lot of people’s favorites lists, but for me they both fell flat. The characters in both novels were unlikable and two-dimensional, and their motives were dumb. Still, I have to give credit where it’s due: The Kind Worth Killing had a very tightly plotted pace that kept me turning pages almost against my will. We Are Not Ourselves started out strong but quickly became a drag, as it has one of the most insufferable protagonists…and it started to get sloppy. At one point late in the novel, a main character suddenly has a sister, even though early in the novel it’s explained that he only has a brother. And Empire of the Summer Moon, a non-fiction account of the Comanche in Texas that won the Pulitzer, was shocking because it’s written from a very solid, Western, Christian, thank-goodness-the-whites-came point of view. I stopped at page 61, but up to that point the pages are flagged and underlined and marked with my notes exhorting my disbelief. Check out this little nugget: “This the fateful clash between settlers from the culture of Aristotle, St. Paul, Da Vinci, Luther, and Newton and aboriginal horsemen from the buffalo plains happened as though in a time warp–as though the former were looking back thousands of years at premoral, pre-christian, low-barbarian versions of themselves.” Because morality did not exist until Christians, y’all.

My other biggest disappointments were This Must Be the Place by Maggie O’Farrell and the third novel in the Elena Ferrante trilogy, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay. This Must Be the Place barely escaped getting a two-star rating from me because it also had an implausible situation at its core and dull characters. I loved The Hand That First Held Mine so much, I had been looking forward to this one since it was announced. And with the Ferrante, I’m not sure what happened. My Brilliant Friend was breathtaking, but the longer the story went on in the third novel, the more it felt like listening to a friend who has a creep of a partner who makes her miserable but whom she refuses to leave. However, the books are interesting from a sociological standpoint, and Ferrante is very good at putting a reader right in the moment without succumbing to melodrama.

In other sort of bookish news, I finally finished The Gilmore Girls, including A Year in the Life. I’m not going to give away any hints about the ending, but I will say I found it kind of disappointing. Seasons 2-4 remain my favorite, and ultimately my favorite character will always be Emily.

I’ll be back soon with a look forward at all the bookish plans I have for 2017. Happy New Year to you all!

Freestyle Friday

Hey Everybody, welcome to the second edition of Freestyle Friday, where I ramble about things that interested me during the week. Let’s get the ball rolling:

  • I am trying, yet again, to get back on a routine running program by following RunKeeper‘s Sub 65-Minute 10K Program. This program starts slowly and helps to build speed and endurance. I’m excited but I also know that I can easily get in my own way. Besides work and just plain laziness, I will sometimes avoid running in neighborhoods around my house because I’m afraid people I know will see me. (This is the exact opposite of my husband, who hopes that everyone we know will see him tearing down the street.) I thought I was the only one who felt this way, but this week I found this on the Mileposts blog: “I’m Embarrassed to Go Running.” I am not alone! Now I need someone to write an “I’m Embarrassed to Lift Free Weights in front of Meatheads at the Gym” post and I’ll be good to go. If you’re interested, you can read a bit more about my struggles with running here.
  • Eddie Izzard, people:

VISCO: Eddie, you do so much.  Would you say you’re superhuman?

IZZARD: Not superhuman. Actually, it’s that all humans can do more than they think they can do. So I think we can all actually be more superhuman than we think we can. 

  • Interesting article on the pressure authors face to get out and promote their books: “The Demands of Book Promotion: Frivolous or Necessary?” I know a lot of bloggers want to help authors as much as they can, but I also notice that quite often I will see a of of bloggers posting about the same book at the same time. Promotion and enthusiasm seems less organic than it was in 2009 when I started this blog, which makes me wonder if as bloggers we are overlooking authors who are less adept at promotion (or who are with a small press with a small budget.) Then again, part of book blogging is joining the conversation, so if we aren’t posting about the book-of-the-moment, we might risk people losing interest. Thoughts? Is this less true for “niche” bloggers who deal with specific genres, markets, or themes? Is it true at all?
  • Okay, this one probably deserves a full post, but I’ll mention it anyway: an opinion piece in the Washington Post about putting warning labels on books. Because I am currently reading The People in the Trees, which graphically features adults in precarious relations with children, I am divided. At the moment I think  maybe for books that feature up-close-and-personal trauma, maybe it’s a good idea? But then, who decides? Warning labels feel like a slippery slope to banning books. I don’t want to see that happen. I’m worried that labels take the responsibility off the individual, but then should readers have to closely research every potential book? I’m going to stop before I really get going…
  • If you’re a serious Mad Men fan like I am, then here’s a post about the Burger Chef restaurant where they filmed this week’s closing shot. Only one more episode this season. I can’t stand it that this show is ending.

Mad Men Burger Chef

  • But speaking of shows, we saw several previews during Orphan Black for In the Flesh and my husband suggested we watch the first season. We only watched the first season of The Walking Dead and am not generally a zombie fan, but we’re enjoying In the Flesh. Anyone else watching?
  • For fun, I thought I would show you all the books I added to my wishlist* this week (I am pretty sure this relates directly to my trouble with the TBR):

The Three, by Sarah Lotz

We Are Not Ourselves, by Matthew Thomas

An Untamed State, by Roxane Gay

Finding Florida, by T.D. Allman

The Divorce Papers, by Susan Krieger

Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932, by Francine Prose

Off Course, by Michelle Huneven

Happy Memorial Day Weekend, US friends! Enjoy the long weekend if you get one!

*All book links are Kindle versions on Amazon. One click and any one of them could be mine! Links are unaffiliated, by the way. If you buy one, I bear no responsibility and receive no profit.


To start, I had this blog post mostly written and then I did some magic with the keyboard and the first draft disappeared. So it has been that kind of day/week/month/year. I am so ready to see 2012 out (Bye bye now. Please do hit yourself on the ass with the door on your way out.) and welcome 2013. (Actually, I cannot believe I just said that. Now I am sure to get struck by lightening or something on January 2.) This year has been, shall we say, challenging. But lately I feel like I need the kind of relief the turn of a clock or a calendar page can bring. I know so, so many people who feel this way because they’ve had a really tough year.

The harder things get, the harder I get on myself, and the more things seem to stand still. The thought struck me this afternoon that I am overwhelmed with “shoulds”: I should eat better, I should exercise more often, I should run longer/faster, I should read more, I should write every day, I should eat out less and cook more meals at home, I should stand up every ten minutes so that I won’t have a shortened life span, I should write a review of that book, I should call so-and-so, I should be more social, and on and on and on.

There is a big difference between “I should” and “I want to,” and somewhere over the last year, things I used to want to do have started to feel like “shoulds.” In this case, a smarter person would probably not add to her list of things to accomplish. But I am a pragmatic optimist. The best thing to do, sometimes, is to give yourself a stern talking to and own up to what you want.

Long-Awaited reads month buttonI haven’t been posting regularly, but one of the things that has made life the last month or so a bit more tolerable is this blog. Being a part of the book blogging community here and on Twitter serves as a reminder to stay in touch with something I love: books. It was in that spirit I decided to hook up with Ana and Iris and a bunch of other great bloggers for Long-Awaited Reads Month in January 2013. It was also in that spirit today that I signed up for The TBR Double Dog Dare hosted by C.B. at Ready When You Are, C.B. Last year I committed to read eight books from my TBR list by April 1, excluding book club books. Given my current reading pace, I’m planning to stick with eight books this year. If I get through more, then that’s just a bonus. (Full disclosure: Last year I also signed up for the Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2012, and I failed miserably. I think almost every book I read this summer with a few exceptions was a new book. Yeah. I SHOULD have read my own books, but I WANTED to read new books. See how I made that work?)

Another thing I was thinking of was perhaps putting together a re-reading group or challenge, if anyone is interested. I have a lot of books that I should want to re-read, but never get the chance. I have no button, I have no page (I could easily put one together), and I don’t want to pressure anyone, obviously. But if, like me, you are hankering to re-read some old favorites and you haven’t been able to get to it, then this could be our chance. Any takers? Let me know in the comments if you’re interested. (I think I have about ten readers, so if you join and fail to complete the challenge, hardly anyone would know! That’s an upside! Going for the hard sell here!)

Let the Games Begin…in January, Anyway

To kick off my return to blogging, I decided that joining a challenge or two might be a good idea. Now, if you ever visited me here a few years back, you know that I tend to be a miserable failure when it comes to challenges. This year, I am determined to read more of my own books. My TBR list is no smaller than it was a over a year ago when I took what became an extended break from blogging (not from reading! never!). In fact, with the addition of my Kindle to the mix, the list has only gotten longer. So, with the TBR in mind, I decided to join the following challenges:

The TBR Double Dare: (Hosted by C.B. James of Ready When You Are, C.B.) From January 1 to April 1, only read books from your existing (as of January 1) TBR pile. The only outside books allowed are book club books and books that were on the library hold list prior to January 1. I’ve committed to reading eight books from my TBR stack…that’s if I can keep myself from filling up my library holds list before January 1 with everything from these year-end lists I keep reading. Must…maintain…control.

So as not to distract myself from the TBR (by, say, reading eight books and then pretending I’ve made a huge dent), I’m joining another TBR challenge, the aptly named Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2012, (hosted by Bev at My Reader’s Block) to help me be accountable for the rest of the year. I’m entering at the Mt. Vancouver level, which is 25 books (and yes, my eight from the TBR Double Dare do count) because I am a wimp easily distracted unpredictable when it comes these things.

I plan to post a page with my TBR list, so you can see what I have to tackle. Wish me luck. I am going to need it!

Updated to add credit to the hosts of these challenges!

TSS: Fun with TBR Lists

sunsalon1Just a short post today, because I have to get working on my NaNoWriMo project. When I am not thinking about plot and characters or worrying about how I will reach my word-count goal (in a meaningful way), I like to think about my reading plans for next year. I keep a notepad next to my computer, and throughout the week I jot down the names of books I read about online that look interesting. Yesterday I decided to put everything in a spreadsheet (what? procrastinating on NaNoWriMo? me?), and here’s what I found: I currently have 179 titles on my TBR wishlist, which consists of books I do not own. Scratch that: I have 179 fiction titles on my TBR list. I haven’t created the non-fiction spreadsheet yet!

As for my actual, physical TBR piles: I have several stacks of unread or partially-read books around the house, so I decided to count those as well. I have 82 unread books here at home–again, this is only the fiction–waiting for me to read them. That’s 261 titles, total!

I like to think of ways to tame the TBR list. The most obvious thing to do, of course, is to stop adding books, to keep the list under control. The problem is, at the end of six years, I would probably find that there were at least 261 interesting books released in the six years I was not adding books, so I would be right back where I started. The other thing I could do is apply the 50-page rule with a vengeance: if I pick up a book and it doesn’t grab me after 50 pages, I stop reading and strike it from the list. The only problem with that is I tend to be moody about my book choices, and I have ended up loving books upon the second read that I hated the first time around. Perhaps I could just move the title to the bottom of the list and give it another chance?

Another problem I have is how to choose which books from the TBR list to read. Should I print out the titles cut them up, and pull them out of a hat? Should I print a wallpaper-sized version of the list and throw darts? Blindfold myself, spin around and play “pin the tail on the TBR”? Ask an objective third party to choose?

Hm. Maybe I am procrastinating, just a little bit. But tell me, how do you tame your TBR? Or do you even try?